|The RMP Blog

Today’s Podcast; Yesterday’s Talk Radio

Talk Radio is not a new concept. It’s an age-old, time-tested format that has officially reclaimed its time in today’s digital landscape. While it’s true that SiriusXM and radio are still alive and well, when’s the last time you listened to either on your mobile device or outside a vehicle? Podcasting, on the other hand, is a highly accessible form of mobile media that is projected to continue on its meteoric rise.

Podcasts are a growing preference amongst commuters in particular. Some of the reasons for this are duration of episodes, ease of use (quick downloads) and preferences towards on-demand and streaming services. According to The Independent UK, research on UK motorists found that 1 of every 6 prefer podcasts to other types of media, which has doubled findings from five years prior. Most podcasts are free and the higher profile ones are usually ad-based, so there’s rarely a fee involved. For example, as I wait for my subway, I can quickly download my favorite podcasts including Unqualified by Anna Farris, Revisionist History by Malcolm Gladwell or even TYT if I’m feeling political. It also gives you seemingly unfettered access to the minds of high profile personalities, public figures and politicians without mainstream media censorship. In other words, hosts can say “Fuck” without getting fined, though expletives and vulgarity could cost them advertisers.

Speaking of creators, they love podcasts because they embed easily into sites and socials, especially when paying for hosting services like Buzzsprout. It’s also important to note that Buzzsprout and comparable hosting companies tout their reach on all major podcast platforms including Google Play, iTunes, Spotify and others at the click of a button. Another plus for podcasting is that the cost of production is relatively low compared to other popular formats so creators can increase their episode frequency, thus increase earning potential. It’s also relatively quick to edit, distribute and post. That being said, pre-production does take considerable work. If you dont believe me, turn on a mic and try to record an engaging podcast…my guess is you’ll have a lot of pauses, “umms” and “What were we talking abouts?” You’ll also need to figure out who your audience is, find a compelling subject matter that you are passionate about, hosts, and engaging guests. Most important is the need to connect with the audience in a more genuine and raw way that other platforms might prohibit.

Podcastinsights.com highlights some really impressive stats on the meteoric growth of podcasting. They laid out the percentage listening to podcasts in the US, where listeners are, how many shows per week, demographic and a 2013-2018 year-by-year bar chart of monthly listeners. Rather than ramble on, I’ll let you check out their comprehensive infographic below.

2018 Podcast Statistics

Now that we’ve covered the reasons podcasting is such a hot space, its time to discuss the one I co-produce with Therese Moriarty, founder of eyeful.us. We created our podcast for our niche community of creative professionals called High Tide, in order to delve into the business side of working in creative fields. So our episodes cover everything from networking to managing cash flow, pipeline, budgeting, slow periods, staying calm in crazy times, contracts and much more. We’ve gotten great feedback, our viewership is building with each episode, and its helped us strengthen our growing community.

I find one of the most significant ways that podcasts differ from other types of media is in audience expectation. If a podcast is too polished, it can actually run the risk of leaving listeners bored. They can go to other platforms for more buttoned up content. In moderation creators can get away with pauses, false-starts and hosts speaking over each other from time to time because it makes it real and brings the audience there in the room when it was recorded. If done well, the audience will feel like they’re a part of the conversation and thats what will keep them clicking on new episodes.

If you have any questions or want to explore developing a podcast for your business, don’t hesitate to reach out to our team at info@rmp.nyc

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